Let’s Finish What We Started

You can do it.

 

finish what started motivate
Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

The feel of the soft yarn as it slides through my fingers. The rhythmic clicking of the metal needles against each other. The almost magical formation of an article fit for wearing from a piece of string.

I paused and examined the hat I was knitting, satisfied with the way it was turning out. I placed my project in my bag for the next time.

But the next time never materialized.

finish what started motivate

I’ve been knitting on and off for about 10 years. I recently took somewhat of a hiatus to focus on some writing, but recently decided to get back into my wool stash.

It got me thinking that knitting is a lot like writing. 

Well, in some ways that is.

They both frustrate the hell out of me sometimes. 

Writing, because the words get all jumbled up in my head and when they do decide to form themselves into beautiful prose, they come out all jumbled up on the computer screen anyway. 

Knitting, especially designing (I’m too flaky to follow most patterns), lends itself to all sorts of jumble-ness too. I can easily create a beautiful design in my head that I can’t seem to translate into the finished piece.

finish what started motivate
Photo by Christian Kielberg on Unsplash

But most of the time, I do love them both. 

Writing and knitting both have provided me comfort and a purpose. 

Like many folks, I turn to my art in times of distress or grief. Sometimes, the best creations are born out of the toughest times.

Our art also provides us a sense of identity. I am a writer. I am a knitter. 

A painter, a furniture-maker, a bonsai enthusiast.

On the one hand, focusing on getting the right words down or counting stitch after stitch provides a concentration and a focus for the mind. It’s like brain exercise for me. Coming up with just the right word and phrasing. Figuring out if I need a left-leaning or a right-leaning decrease.

On the other hand, both activities can have a tremendously relaxing and meditative effect. Letting the mind wander as words flow effortlessly onto the page. Words that are not destined to be read by anyone but myself. There is no pressure, no deadline, no criticism. 

The same can happen with knitting. Certain stitch types (endless garter, for you knowing knitters out there) can provide a kind of solace as your hands, using muscle memory, allow the wool to flow through them creating a soft and squishy fabric that will eventually become an item fit for your head, hands or neck.

finish what started motivate
Photo by Clark Young on Unsplash

Sometimes, as I’m writing something, I pause and look at it as I read it. My head nods ever so slightly as I decide that this could work.

The same happens in knitting. I’ll just begin knitting without a project really in mind, and pause and look at it and think the same thing.

I will continue to write. Writing is a lot newer to me than knitting, and I’ve enjoyed it so much. 

I’m also excited to get back to knitting. I can and will do both.

They will both continue to frustrate me at times, and both will continue to be a part of me and encourage and comfort and define me.


What have you placed away “just for now” or “until the next time” and that next time never came?

Is there a book you started writing, but never got around to finishing? Maybe, like me, you began a craft project that has been waiting patiently for you to pick it back up and finish it.

I’d like to encourage you today, right now even, to go and find that book or project. Look at it and let it speak to you. Allow your mind to remember what it was about it that excited you or motivated you. What did you enjoy about it? 

Perhaps the frustration you were feeling with it was too much, so you needed time away. Hey, it happens to all of us. But now that time has passed, you can look at it with a new eye. You can get excited about it, and begin again.

I feel it’s so important to finish what we’ve begun. This hasn’t been my strong suit recently. But that’s changing. 

I’m finishing my hat.

Lessons I’ve Learned from Reading Personal Growth Books

Post may contain affiliate links. Please see Affiliate Policy here.

If you found us through Pinterest, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Pinterest.

Several months ago, a friend recommended a book called E-Squared by Pam Grout. Maybe you’ve heard of it? Or even read it?

personal growth books glasses
Photo by Nicole Honeywill on Unsplash

I was seeking suggestions for reading material as I had been in a reading funk. (And I really wasn’t in the mood for the Harry Potter series…again. I mean, it’s one of my favorites, but you can only read it so many times in a lifetime, right?)

My friend explained E-Squared was basically about manifesting the reality you desire and the Law of Attraction, the theory that our thoughts are made of energy and we attract what we focus on.

I’d heard of the LOA before, but never gave it much thought.

So I checked E-Squared out from the library and read it. I was going through a difficult time and figured it might shine some hope my way.

I admit it, I loved it. So I followed it with E-Cubed (by the same author). And then, I may have become slightly addicted to the “self-improvement” genre.

personal growth books

I devoured several other books after the “E” ones: Thank and Grow Rich(again, by Ms. Grout), You are a BadassThe Game of Life and How to Play It,The Four AgreementsHelp Thanks Wow, and You Can Heal Your Life, among others.

As I read each book, I began noticing something. While from differing perspectives, the message always seemed remarkably similar. This isn’t a criticism. I was intrigued that these authors were able to describe basically the same concepts, but in their own unique — and entertaining — voices.

The following are the main concepts that I extracted from my reading, and my understanding of each one.

Self-love and self-worth are paramount.

They are the foundation on which we build all of our relationships. In general,we don’t allow others to treat us any worse than we treat ourselves. If we have a very low self-worth, that sets the bar low for conduct from others. Loving ourselves creates a high standard of what kind of treatment we will allow from other people.

personal growth woman hands heart
Photo by Wang Xi on Unsplash

This is not the same as conceit or ego or selfishness, which is usually based on fear that others might see us as less than worthy. Developing and maintaining positive self-worth on the other hand is realizing and understanding that we have as much right as anyone else to exist and that we are loved unconditionally by the Universe that created us.

Self-worth can be created and grown. But it takes practice. Most people are so used to diminishing their own worth by telling themselves they’re worthless, not good enough, too fat, to quiet, to this-or that.

A simple — but difficult at first — method to self-love is to tell yourself affirmations every day as often as possible, all the time. Look in the mirror and tell yourself how much you are loved, how beautiful you are. Some of my affirmations are sweet and nice; other times, I give myself the proverbial tough love when I need it. It all works for me.

Talk to yourself like you would to someone you love. — Brené Brown

It will seem silly at first, but with practice, it will become second nature. Even if you don’t believe the affirmations at first, keep at it, and eventually you will become to know they are true. If you were willing to believe the destructive lies that you told yourself, you can certainly learn to believe the truths that you are in fact priceless and loved beyond measure.

Adopt an attitude of gratitude.

At first, this can be difficult in practice. Society constantly tells us what we need, and we always need more or we can’t be happy. The news and media consistently remind us that we have very little to be grateful for.

personal growth woman sunflower
Photo by Nicole Honeywill on Unsplash

But when we are thankful for what we already have, we don’t feel like we need more, more, more.

Practicing gratitude provides us with a sense of contentment and peace (and an uncluttered living space as a bonus). But it goes further than that. When we are grateful for what we have, it compels us to want to provide for and be of service to others.

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder. — Gilbert K. Chesterton

We create our own realities and everyone’s is different.

This concept basically states that we all view things from different perspectives. Folks view situations based on their preconceived ideas and the judgments that have been ingrained in their minds during their lifetimes.

So whose perspective is “right?”

Take the old woman/young woman optical illusion. One person will see the young woman. Someone else will see the old lady. Both folks are looking at the exact same picture, yet both see completely different subjects, and both are correct. This proves we all see things differently and we can all be right.

An extension of this concept is that we can actually control and change our thoughts and preconceived ideas. We control our thoughts, not the other way around.

This too takes practice, but once it’s mastered, it opens doors to the insights of others as well as ourselves. Furthermore, we can create or change our realities simply by changing or controlling our thoughts about our situations.

We are not disturbed by what happens to us, but by our thoughts about what happens to us. — Epictetus

And our thoughts are energy. According to the Law of Attraction, we can attract love, compassion, wealth and a multitude of other positive experiences by expressing these things ourselves.


I’ve implemented these concepts into my life and have experience positive changes. Perhaps they can help you as well. ❤

Word Hoard Weekend: February 15, 2019

Post may contain affiliate links. Please see Affiliate Policy here.

If you found us through Pinterest, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Pinterest.

Happy weekend, fellow logophiles!

Well, it’s been pretty crazy here in the Seattle area the past couple of weeks. Snowmageddon, or Snowpocalypse, has rendered many of us prisoners in our own homes. I’m beginning to wonder if the kids will ever go back to school.

But, just like in every situation, the positives stare you in the face if you are willing to look. It’s a great excuse to snuggle in with your coffee or hot chocolate (both of which have been copiously consumed here lately) in front of the fireplace, and write to your heart’s content.

word hoard weekend

This weekend’s collection is a nice variety of adjectives, which are usually used to describe nouns.

Adjectives kind of have a bad rap. Author Stephen King said the road to hell is paved with adjectives, and many writers overuse them in an effort to make their writing flowery or dramatic. It depends on how and where they’re used, but it’s important to be watchful of your usage of these descriptors.

For your free Word Hoard Printable, click here.

For the First Word Hoard Weekend, click here

Ineffable

word hoard ineffable

Ineffable can mean indescribable or unspeakable. It comes from the Latin words for not and capable of being expressed.  I’ve seen it used to describe things of greatness or beauty (the ineffable beauty of mountains) or something unspeakable (an ineffable disgust at his words).

Tenebrous

word hoard tenebrous

Tenebrous is a synonym for dark, murky, obscure or causing gloom. According to Merriam-Webster, it comes from the Latin noun, tenebrae, meaning darkness. Use it to describe a foggy grove, or a moonless night, or a haunted house perhaps.

Related: This Fun Activity Will Improve Your Writing

Arcadian

word hoard arcadian

While Arcadian literally refers to the Greek region of Arcadia, its definition of simplicity and untroubled by worry or fear comes from the simple and easygoing way of life of the ancient Arcadians.

Ephemeral

word hoard ephemeral

Ephemeral is a synonym for fleeting, short-lived or brief. An example is: footprints in the sand are ephemeral. And I just think it’s a beautiful-sounding word.

Antiquated

word hoard antiquated

Antiquated is also a cool-sounding word. It means old-fashioned or outdated. Examples include antiquated opinions about the roles of the genders in society; or the antiquated pluming system in the old house.

Are you familiar with these words? Have you used them in your writing?

For those of you surrounded by an abundance of snow this weekend, enjoy the hunkering down. For everyone else, have a great writing weekend!

What are your favorite words? Let me know in the comments.

 

How to Overcome Writing Obstacles as an Introvert

Photo by Igor Kasalovic on Unsplash

Hello, fellow introvert.

So, you want to write and share it with the world, right? You’ve set up your blog or your account at Medium.com. Now what?

I mean, after all, sharing your writing with an unfamiliar audience is kinda like stepping up on that stage while trying not to trip over the hem of your dress and giving the all-important speech while your confidence slowly ebbs away. Maybe this wasn’t such a good idea after all…

No worries. I’ve been there. Heck, I am there. Every time I write something and hover that little arrow over the publish button, my introversion rears it’s feathery, azure-eyed head, and I tremble into a wobbly ball of anxiety.

But there are some methods introverts can use to overcome the obstacles of sharing your writing. You just need to find a few things first.

overcome writing obstacles introvert

So let’s go on a scavenger hunt. As introverts, we’ll look for, and find, three things that will help us write our very best.

Find Your Voice

As a beginning writer, you will find it difficult to find your voice at first. You may try out different voices as you struggle to find the words and style that reflect YOU. Maybe you’ll try imitate your favorite author or blogger. You might get so worked up on finding just the right words or phrasing, that you’ll be in editing mode forever.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

That’s OK. At first. That’s why you practice. And practice some more. And even more. As you continue your practice, you and your voice will get to know and become more familiar with each other.

It’ll be like a first date, where you’re not sure you want to spend more time with the person, but hey, it was pretty good, so maybe we’ll try it out again. The next time, you become a little more comfortable with each other, more relaxed. Then the time after that, it will become yet a little easier; you continue to become more comfortable, and eventually the words and phrases flow easily.

Your writing voice is the deepest possible reflection of who you are. The job of your voice is not to seduce or flatter or make well-shaped sentences. In your voice, your readers should be able to hear the contents of your mind, your heart, your soul. -Meg Rosoff

I find it helpful to ignore most of the advice from the “experts.” Yes, grammar, vocabulary and syntax is important, but sometimes rules are made to be broken. For the most part, I find the best practice is to write how you speak. Let your personality shine through. Don’t try to sound like someone else, even your favorite author.

Are you a bubbly type? Or a more serious personality? Writing like you speak will make you more genuine in your readers’ eyes.

On a related note, do you publicly share your initial attempts at writing? I think it’s a good idea to do so, and even encourage it. The reason: you may never start otherwise. If your goal is to share your writing with others, if you think your writing isn’t good enough, not quite yet, you’ll procrastinate until not quite yet becomes never. As long as you’re publishing online, the Edit button will always be there for you.

Find Ideas

You may think that everything’s been done and said before, that there are no new ideas.

That’s true.

The good news is no one’s heard your version yet.

As an introvert, where can you collect your ideas? Many suggestions stem from being out and about in the world, surrounded by other people, folks you pass on the street, overhear in the coffee shops, etc.

Photo by Clever Visuals on Unsplash

As an introvert myself, I usually actively try to avoid those places. Situations like those can cause mental drainage at the best, and anxiety at the worst. As an introvert, you probably spend much of your time in your own home, alone or surrounded by your family.

Additionally, you’re not likely to be able to focus on obtaining writing ideas and collecting notes if you keep checking your watch for the time you get to go home and recharge.

So, where can you find great writing ideas? There are plenty of sources, but I suggest ignoring the advice to write what you know.

Writers don’t write from experience, although many are hesitant to admit that they don’t. …If you wrote from experience, you’d get maybe one book, maybe three poems. Writers write from empathy. -Nikki Giovanni

The most important source of writing ideas for introverts is the imagination. As a general rule, we’re a creative bunch. So, sit back, relax, and pull from the center of your mind secrets, desires and motivations with which you can use to create a character or construct a blog post.

Other sources of inspiration include your family and your close (small) circle of friends. Perhaps your neighborhood will provide ideas. Look out the window. What do you see? Your neighbors? Write a soap opera (changing the names to protect the innocent of course). Woods, deer and birds (in my case)? Let some poetry materialize. Is your view of a bustling busy skyline? Try to creatively describe the shapes, colors, angles and other things you see. These ideas may or may not turn into masterpieces, but they will be useful as some helpful practice.

Find Courage

Fear. This may be the single most debilitating obstacle for an introvert who wants to share his or her writing.

Fear keeps us stuck in a quagmire, right where we’re at, right now. It keep us from moving forward.

And guess what? Most folks stay in this very spot.

What if you fail? Ray Bradbury once said you fail only if you stop writing. And he’s right, you know. As long as you persevere and keep on practicing your craft, you’re not failing. Seems pretty easy right? All you need to do is KEEP WRITING.

But, but, but…what if I offend someone?

I’m going to tell you right now: It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.

I promise if you publicly share your writing, you WILL offend someone, somewhere, sometime.

But, who cares? I understand though, because I still struggle with this. Others will have differing opinions and views, but it doesn’t mean you (or they) are wrong. It’s OK, and even desirable, to sometimes be forced to look at things in a different way.

And about hateful comments from strangers? They don’t mean a thing. The support and love you receive from your longtime and loyal readers, friends and family: that’s the important stuff. Learn to ignore the haters. They’re not worth your time.

Then there’s that pesky fear of not being good enough.

Photo by Sammie Vasquez on Unsplash

Whoa, stop right there. This comes from comparing yourself to others. Quit it right now. Every single writer in the history of the world started at the beginning. Some folks are far along in their writing journey, while you may be just beginning. In a year, or five, you’ll be farther along in your journey than someone will be just starting out.

Think about it; when you’re writer extraordinaire in a few years or after a lifetime, you may be encouraging the next newbie.

Maybe you’re afraid of actually succeeding?

Why? Because it’s comfortable here. Change, even positive change, is scary.

It’s hard to let go of the grip on comfort, on familiarity. But if you want to move forward, to grow, to become inspired, you’re gonna have to let go. Don’t be afraid.


As in introvert, once you find your voice, ideas, and courage, the rest is a piece of cake. You’ll encounter plenty of stumbling blocks along the way, but you’ll have no problem navigating them. You’ll be well on your way to becoming the best writer you can be.

It’s a lifelong journey, but one that is well worth it.

Word Hoard Weekend: February 8, 2019

Post may contain affiliate links. Please see Affiliate Policy here.

If you found us through Pinterest, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Pinterest.

Happy Weekend!

One of my favorite ways to spice up my writing is to learn new vocabulary. So I’ve created a Word Hoard. A Word Hoard is like your own little personal dictionary of your favorite words or phrases.

For the next several weekends, I’ll post my favorite cool, unusual or interesting words. Save them to your Pinterest Word Hoard or pen them on your Free Word Hoard Printable. (Subscribe to my email list to get your printable here. Print off several of these and keep them in a three-ring Writer’s Notebook!)

word hoard weekend

So, my fellow logophiles (lover of words), let’s get started collecting.

Pluviophile

word hoard pluviophile rain lover

You won’t find this word over at Merriam-Webster, but it’s one of my favorites, because I’m definitely a pluviophile. My favorite days are those made up of a nice drizzle or downpour, when I can snuggle up on my couch with my coffee in front of the fireplace.

According to Urban Dictionary, it comes from the Latin word Pluvial, meaning rain, and the suffix -phile, referring to a fondness or attraction.

Ruminate

word hoard weekend ruminate think

Let’s ruminate the word for awhile. While ruminate can mean to think deeply about something or to chew repeatedly for an extended amount of time, I prefer the definition. The word actually derives from the Latin word for rumen, the stomach compartment for ruminate animals, like cows.

Synonyms of ruminate include ponder, meditate, and consider.

Taciturn

word hoard weekend taciturn

Isn’t this a beautiful word? Use it in place of quiet, reserved or uncommunicative.

In my opinion, taciturn is a positive personality trait, as many folks have pointed out:

Better to Remain Silent and Be Thought a Fool than to Speak and Remove All Doubt

Defenestration

word hoard weekend defenestration

I was quite amused that there was a term for this, although recently, it has been used to forcibly remove someone from a high-ranking office (by tossing out of a window or otherwise).

It’s a pretty old word, first used in 1619, according to Merriam-Webster.

Ameliorate

word hoard weekend ameliorate

Ameliorate is a synonym of the verbs to improve or better. It is usually used when the situation being improved is bad or negative in the first place. It is not generally used when something that is already good is being improved upon.

But I do like the sound of this word, and looks good in writing when used correctly.

What are your favorite words? Let me know in the comments!

Motivation Monday: Stop Not Writing

Post may contain affiliate links. Please see Affiliate Policy here.

The other day, I came across this tweet from one of my favorite authors, Anne Lamott:

If you’ve ever read any of Anne’s works, you’ll know that words seem to come to her as easily as I can burn a pancake.

But they certainly don’t come easily to me. Perhaps they don’t for you either.

But that doesn’t matter today. Today is about what Anne expresses in her tweet. Don’t think about it. Sit down. Open your laptop (or pull out your notebook and favorite lime green pen). Type (or write) words. One after another. They don’t need to be good. In fact, they probably won’t be.

writing motivation monday

No editing allowed today. You can edit tomorrow. (That’s not procrastinating, I promise.)

I suppose if you’re reading this while brushing your teeth or letting the dog out for his nightly business, so you can go crawl into bed for a great night’s sleep, you have my permission to wait until tomorrow to get your butt in the chair and write some words.

But if you’re reading this as a procrastination technique to get out of writing, stop it right now. Do as directed above.

If you have no ideas on what to write, no matter. Just write words that pop into your head. Write awful sentences. Write about what you did today. Make up a character that is part human, part humpback whale, and part chihuahua and explain how he was able to go into the local bank branch and open an account despite not being able to fit through the front doors.

If you need more motivation from Anne, I highly recommend her book, Bird by Bird. The title refers to her father’s advice to her brother when faced with the daunting task of writing a report on birds that was due the following day, after putting it off for a couple of months. (Now, that’s procrastination.)

So, go write. Let us know in the comments how you did. What did you write about?